02 Feb 2017

The quality of the water we use is vital to us as is makes up 80% of the human body. Why settle for average quality drinking water and pay grossly over charged prices for bottled water when a simple filtration system can solve a lot of water issues. If your water tastes bad, is full of sediment, smells or is discoloured, simple filtration can remove these impurities and make the water fit for drinking purposes inexpensively. For water full of Iron or maganese, reverse osmosis or salt treatment system may be required.

02 Feb 2017
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We stock a variety of aluminium Radiators from famous brand manufacturers with a wealth of experience. If we can be of more help to you, by making your installation experience easier, please let us know and we will try to endeavour.

02 Feb 2017
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The heart of all heating and plumbing installations lies in the quality of the pipes and fittings used. These components are constantly being stressed and tested time and time again with varying pressures and temperatures. We believe in using the best quality materials available today in the world. All our pipe carries a 50 year warranty and certificates are available on request. You can trust us when it comes to quality product at a quaity price. We have 47 years experience in the heating and plumbing industry, some would say its a lifetime! Enjoy our products.

02 Feb 2017
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Heating is required to warm domestic, commercial and industrial buildings. Heating is provided in many shapes and forms and consists of hundreds of components to make a heating system operate successfully for many years. The key to a good heating system operating correctly and efficiently is in the materials used. Quality materials last and are trouble free!

02 Feb 2017
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Renewable energy is energy which comes from natural resources such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, and geothermal heat, which are renewable (naturally replenished). About 16% of global final energy consumption comes from renewables, with 10% coming from traditional biomass, which is mainly used for heating, and 3.4% from hydroelectricity. New renewables (small hydro, modern biomass, wind, solar, geothermal, and biofuels) accounted for another 3% and are growing very rapidly.

The share of renewables in electricity generation is around 19%, with 16% of global electricity coming from hydroelectricity and 3% from new renewables. Wind power is growing at the rate of 30% annually, with a worldwide installed capacity of 198 gigawatts (GW) in 2010, and is widely used in Europe, Asia, and the United States. At the end of 2010, cumulative global photovoltaic (PV) installations surpassed 40 GW and PV power stations are popular in Germany and Spain. Solar thermal power stations operate in the USA and Spain, and the largest of these is the 354 megawatt (MW) SEGS power plant in the Mojave Desert.

The world’s largest geothermal power installation is the Geysers in California, with a rated capacity of 750 MW. Brazil has one of the largest renewable energy programs in the world, involving production of ethanol fuel from sugarcane, and ethanol now provides 18% of the country’s automotive fuel. Ethanol fuel is also widely available in the USA. While many renewable energy projects are large-scale, renewable technologies are also suited to rural and remote areas, where energy is often crucial in human development.

As of 2011, small solar PV systems provide electricity to a few million households, and micro-hydro configured into mini-grids serves many more. Over 44 million households use biogas made in household-scale digesters for lighting and/or cooking, and more than 166 million households rely on a new generation of more-efficient biomass cookstoves. United Nations’ Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has said that renewable energy has the ability to lift the poorest nations to new levels of prosperity.

Climate change concerns, coupled with high oil prices, peak oil, and increasing government support, are driving increasing renewable energy legislation, incentives and commercialization. New government spending, regulation and policies helped the industry weather the global financial crisis better than many other sectors. According to a 2011 projection by the International Energy Agency, solar power generators may produce most of the world’s electricity within 50 years, dramatically reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases that harm the environment.